Best Puppy House Training Tips Using Clicks and Treats

Written by Senior Editor Peter Gehr

Best Puppy House Training Tips Using Clicks and Treats

Best Puppy House Training Tips Using Clicks and Treats

The best puppy house training tips using clicks and treats can start the very day you bring your new pet home. If you begin immediately, you will be developing a fresh new habit for your dog, as well as helping him/her to connect with his new environment.

Hearing these clicks will be foreign to your puppy, but if you start by associating the click with a reward, the dog will begin to quickly understand that the click is his new center of attention and he will respond positively. Each time you use the click method it should be immediately followed up with a treat. It’s vital that the clicker is not overused by other family members, or used for any other reason other than to train your puppy. Be sure everyone in your household fully understands that the use of the clicker is for training purposes and should be utilized properly and responsibly.

In fact, if your clicker is not used correctly, your pet will soon learn to ignore it, and its use will then become of no use at all.

Some dog trainers don’t use a clicker at all, and are very successful at house training. There are several methods that work equally as good, and the point of the exercise is to be patient, diligent, watchful and consistent. I’m focusing on the clicker training method in this article as it’s a very good technique for new dog owners who have never house trained a puppy before.

Best Puppy House Training Tips Using Clicks and Treats

House training can be started immediately you get your pup home, using dog obedience training techniques, because it is really never too early to start.

You can stay outside with the pup, let him explore and investigate his world, but watch him. When his breathing is calm, feed him, and then, as soon as he is finished eating, take him outside and wait for him to poop. Now put him in the crate and put the crate in an area where the pup can see you. He will settle down and when he wakes up, you will be able to release him from the crate and take him straight outside.

Until he has gained some control of his bladder at around 4 months old, I recommend you use some form of barriers to keep the pup contained in an area that has floors easy to clean whenever he is not in his crate. If you put newspaper on the floor, this will help with the clean up. The obedience training technique I recommend is the use of a clicker which you use to tell the pup he has just done the right thing by toileting outside. You need to introduce the pup to the noise of the click as quickly as possible.

When you bring your pup home, you have just ripped it away from its mom and siblings and dumped it into a strange environment. It is going to be a little upset and stressed. You need to have bought a dog crate before the dog comes home. If there is going to be someone at home with the pup, have a good game with the pup to tire him. Let him stop huffing and puffing and then give him a light meal. If you feed any dog immediately after strenuous exercise, you have a good chance of ending up with stomach torsion.

Start by just clicking and rewarding. Use tiny morsels of roast chicken. About the size of a match head. You want to get as many clicks in as you can in a minute, but every click must be followed instantly with a reward, and the pup must be able to swallow the treat instantly. This continues for about five minutes. Then slow down the click rate and put a short gap between clicks around 5 to 10 seconds. You are now teaching the pup that the click means he gets a reward. Click here to visit the original source of this post

A small puppy should not be given free range inside your home. He must first learn by being confined to a penned in area where he will sleep and eat—which is what he’ll be doing most of the time anyway. Keep a close eye on him at all times, and remember that although the best puppy house training tips using clicks and treats is very effective, your puppy will have accidents and it’s important to clean up immediately without making a big fuss about it—he’s just a puppy, and is learning a brand new process. It’s a good idea to take your puppy to the place outside where you want him to poop. It’s the regularity and timing that you will learn and become accustomed to as you become accustomed to your dogs needs—and this is the best methodology in the house training process.

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Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Written by Senior Editor Peter Gehr

Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Best puppy housebreaking tips: How to housetrain an adult dog. As the saying goes, “You can’t teach old dog new tricks,” but I beg to differ as I’ve done it myself, and seen it done successfully by others too. Yes, it will be a challenge, and will take patience on your part, but if you’ve adopted a dog from the pound or rescue center then you need to be aware that the dog will have habits that will need to be changed, and this is where your love and patience will need to kick in.

It may take 3 or 4 weeks for you to break any bad habits, and if one of those is housebreaking, then this time-frame will be about right—as long as you are consistent and caring, and give the dog a chance to learn and be educated.

The particular case below is from an expert dog trainer and friend of the Cesar Millan, Cheri Lucas. The article below is in response to a question posed by a dog-lover who rescued a Yorkshire terrier from a dog mill:

Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Dogs that have been kept in puppy mill environments often never see the light of day. The everyday sights and sounds that you and I are used to can be overwhelming to a dog that has spent the first several years confined.

Often breeding dogs are kept in cages with wire flooring to minimize clean up. Dogs are naturally hardwired not to want to be near their own waste, but dogs kept in these conditions are forced to urinate and defecate in the small space they live in. Lying in their own filth becomes the norm.

Even if he doesn’t show it, your Yorkie may be feeling very stressed out at the idea of being in the great outdoors. Remember, he spent the first five years of his life in an environment that was stark and small. If he’s too tense, he will wait until he’s more relaxed inside your home before he urinates and defecates.

Inside of putting him outside alone, take him on a nice long walk first. If he doesn’t eliminate at this time, go to your backyard with him. Keep your interactions with your dog to a minimum during this time. It will be easier for him to relax and decompress if he’s not focused on you. If he eliminates at this time, calmly reward him with praise. Now you can bring him inside, knowing that he actually took care of his business outside.

It’s very important that you supervise your Yorkie when you bring him back into the house. If you can’t watch him 100 percent of the time, set up a comfortable, small confinement area or a crate for him. I’m a big believer in crate training, and your Yorkie is a perfect candidate for it. Not only is a crate the perfect house training tool, it’s also a modern day den for your dog—a safe and secure comfort zone.

You’ll need to take your Yorkie outside more frequently than normal until he establishes new habits. It may take several weeks for him to understand this unfamiliar routine. Chances are he will make a few mistakes along the way. Using strict supervision will allow you to correct him when you witness “pre-potty” behavior such as sniffing, circling, or scratching the floor. When you see this, quickly but calmly lead him outside and wait for him to eliminate. Reward the behavior before bringing him back inside. Click here to visit the original source of this post

Best puppy housebreaking tips: How to housetrain an adult dog will depend on your regularity, and this will make all the difference to the outcome. Be aware that an older dog will make mistakes, and it’s important that you do not get angry or lose your patience during this adjustment period. Especially if a dog has come from an abusive situation, and a dog mill can definitely slot into that category. Keeping in mind that accidents will happen will make this transition more comfortable and attainable for your new canine, and sticking to a systematic program will lead to a successful change of habits.

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Best Puppy Training Advice and Resolutions for the New Year

Written by Senior Editor Peter Gehr

Best Puppy Training Advice and Resolutions for the New Year

Best Puppy Training Advice and Resolutions for the New Year

If you want some of the best puppy training advice and resolutions for the New Year there are several points to cover to keep your pooch happy and healthy. It should go without saying, but I’m going to say it anyway: what goes in your pet’s mouth has a lot to do with his/her wellbeing, and a dog is a dog—not a human being.

You’d be amazed at some of the foods that are actually detrimental to your dog’s health, and that innocent or fun snack you think is hilarious to feed your pet, could very well make them sick or be fatal.

Avocado, tea or coffee, ice cream, and chocolate are just a few of the foods that can be extremely dangerous if fed to your puppy. Although it might be cute to watch your dog chow down his favorite ice cream, just be warned that it is unnatural and unhealthy with potentially life-threatening consequences.

Best Puppy Training Advice and Resolutions for the New Year

Pat Summers writing for New Jersey Pets says:

Protect your pet – from unfriendly animals, over-enthusiastic little kids, harmful plants, other dangers of all kinds. Consider microchipping in addition to a collar and ID tag. Keep accurate medical records and “vet your pet” as needed.

Train her/him. A puppy that jumps on people can be cute; a full grown dog that does that can be a menace. House training isn’t an option, it’s a necessity. Barking whenever and wherever isn’t acceptable. Begging is never so. Start training early and be consistent.

Respect your pet’s individuality. With more than one pet, don’t announce or play favorites. Cultivate (safe) idiosyncrasies and enjoy differing personalities. Don’t expect or build robo-dogs or cats.

Assure daily quality time for each pet. This means your undivided attention to them, not idly petting while doing something else, not giving treats in lieu of caring, not using your cell phone while walking your dog. Give them time and attention, your two most precious gifts.

Feed pets well, on pet food only, on time. Exceptions should be rare and still be safe – so, never chocolate, never raisins. This is harder for you to do than it is for your pets. If they don’t learn to know “people food,” they won’t miss it.

Groom your pet. You like to look your best; let your pet(s) enjoy that feeling too. Bathe, brush, comb and clip nails and claws – are we forgetting anything else?

Reinforce pets’ sense of trust. Don’t play tricks or scare or spring new rules on your dog or cat. At all times, you are your pets’ protector – never the person they need to watch out for or guard against. (Full story here)

These are just a few pointers for best puppy training advice and resolutions for the New Year, and add some of your own to this list. Much the same as with children, giving of your time to your pet is the best gift. Offering quality exercise and play time with your puppy will strengthen the bond and build that relationship that makes having a pet so special.

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