Spay or Neuter Benefits: Top 10 Behavior Facts and Reasons Why

Written by Senior Editor Peter Gehr

The growing awareness of the spay or neuter benefits: top 10 behavior facts and reasons why to comply is helping pet owners come forward and take care of the needed procedure to bring about the reduction of homeless or unwanted animals in our communities.

This is an easy process, and the animal is doctored with care and the time spent recuperating is minimal, but comes with maximum benefits for everyone in the long run. There are budget sensitive programs made available and affordable surgeries have been set up in most states across the country. In fact, the ASPCA offer a mobile clinic which is often free or very lost cost.

I’m providing the link to this information for your easy reference:

ASPCA Spay or Neuter Provider Database

Spay or Neuter Benefits: Top 10 Behavior Facts and Reasons Why

If you need more persuasion, please read the top 10 benefits and facts to spay or neuter your dog below:

Spay or Neuter Benefits: Top 10 Behavior Facts and Reasons Why

Spay or Neuter Benefits: Top 10 Behavior Facts and Reasons Why

1. Your female pet will live a longer, healthier life.

Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer, which is fatal in about 50 percent of dogs and 90 percent of cats. Spaying your pet before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases.

 

2. Neutering provides major health benefits for your male.

Besides preventing unwanted litters, neutering your male companion prevents testicular cancer, if done before six months of age.

 

3. Your spayed female won’t go into heat.

While cycles can vary, female felines usually go into heat four to five days every three weeks during breeding season. In an effort to advertise for mates, they’ll yowl and urinate more frequently—sometimes all over the house!

 

4. Your male dog won’t want to roam away from home.

An intact male will do just about anything to find a mate! That includes digging his way under the fence and making like Houdini to escape from the house. And once he’s free to roam, he risks injury in traffic and fights with other males.

 

5. Your neutered male will be much better behaved.

Neutered cats and dogs focus their attention on their human families. On the other hand, unneutered dogs and cats may mark their territory by spraying strong-smelling urine all over the house. Many aggression problems can be avoided by early neutering.

 

6. Spaying or neutering will NOT make your pet fat.

Don’t use that old excuse! Lack of exercise and overfeeding will cause your pet to pack on the extra pounds—not neutering. Your pet will remain fit and trim as long as you continue to provide exercise and monitor food intake.

 

7. It is highly cost-effective.

The cost of your pet’s spay/neuter surgery is a lot less than the cost of having and caring for a litter. It also beats the cost of treatment when your unneutered tom escapes and gets into fights with the neighborhood stray!

 

8. Spaying and neutering your pet is good for the community.

Stray animals pose a real problem in many parts of the country. They can prey on wildlife, cause car accidents, damage the local fauna and frighten children. Spaying and neutering packs a powerful punch in reducing the number of animals on the streets.

 

9. Your pet doesn’t need to have a litter for your children to learn about the miracle of birth.

Letting your pet produce offspring you have no intention of keeping is not a good lesson for your children—especially when so many unwanted animals end up in shelters. There are tons of books and videos available to teach your children about birth in a more responsible way.

 

10. Spaying and neutering helps fight pet overpopulation.

Every year, millions of cats and dogs of all ages and breeds are euthanized or suffer as strays. These high numbers are the result of unplanned litters that could have been prevented by spaying or neutering. (Original article here)

Spay or neuter benefits: top 10 behavior facts and reasons why should be clear by now. The overpopulation of animal shelters is a growing concern in almost every community, and the plain and simple facts that each shelter are faced with on a daily basis results in unthinkable amounts of pets being euthanized. Please respond by taking action if you haven’t already, and play your part in helping to reduce the sad end of animals that could have otherwise lived a loved and long life.

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Best Puppy Spay or Neuter Information for Your New Pet

Written by Senior Editor Peter Gehr

The best puppy spay or neuter information for your new pet comes with a passionate plea to take action to avoid the following complications: disputes with neighbors, unexpected breeding, wandering male dogs, homeless pets, and over-crowded animal shelters. These are just a few of the problems stemming from ignoring the procedures required to keep your dog from any of the above. Some may argue that it’s not natural, but I’ll stop that argument right there by suggesting you visit your nearest animal shelter and talk to the staff whose grizzly task is to euthanize homeless “natural” dogs every day.

Best Puppy Spay or Neuter Information for Your New Pet

Best Puppy Spay or Neuter Information for Your New Pet

There are assistance programs available for those who cannot afford to spay or neuter their pets, and with minimal effort the outcome can be achieved with little fuss. Most animal shelters across the country provide information on how to tap into these resources if needed.

Best Puppy Spay or Neuter Information for Your New Pet

This article from the Marrieta Times sums it up my sentiments:

Our pets provide unconditional love day in and day out, so it’s only right that they deserve our attention.

Any pet owner must take responsibility for their animals by offering a safe and warm home, food and water and daily exercise.

Dogs and cats require much time, commitment and even money, but beyond the duties of food, water, care, companionship and exercise, pet owners must realize they can add to the pet overpopulation problem by not spaying or neutering their furry friends.

With the growing numbers in pet ownership – some 74.8 million dogs are owned in the United States, while almost 90 million cats belong to someone – thankfully, many veterinarians and volunteers throughout the United States know the importance of spaying and neutering, and Spay Day USA, a Doris Day Animal Foundation national campaign, was created.

Pet owners who neglect their dogs and cats by letting them run loose and refusing to have the animals spayed or neutered are a burden on their communities through the overcrowding of streets and neighborhoods and, ultimately, shelters with helpless, homeless animals.

Statistics show that two unaltered cats and all their descendents can theoretically number 420,000 in just seven years, while two unaltered dogs and all their descendents can theoretically number 67,000 in six years, according to information provided by the Humane Society of the United States.

Anyone visiting area dog pounds and animal shelters knows the many unwanted pets waiting to be adopted. Statistics have proven that most of these animals won’t go to a new home and will be put down, as an estimated 5 million cats and dogs are killed in shelters every year.

Unfortunately, some pet owners are reluctant to spay or neuter their animals, but animals as young as 6 months old can safely undergo the procedures, according to any veterinarian.

For pet owners who cannot afford to have their animals spayed or neutered, many shelters will provide financial assistance for the surgery. Help is only a phone call away. Remember, it’s a pet owner’s responsibility to help reduce the number of homeless animals – period. Click here to visit the original source of this post

The best puppy spay or neuter information for your new pet is to consult with your local veterinarian to schedule a time for your dog to get “fixed” so that he/she is not going to contribute to the pandemic of homeless pets. The statistics above are alarming as to how much breeding can go one in six years with just two unaltered dogs. This should be enough to step up to the plate and make the effort to comply and to do the right thing for your dog, your family, and the greater community.

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