Best Puppy Yorkshire Terrier: World’s Smallest Therapy Dog

Written by Senior Editor Peter Gehr

Best Puppy Yorkshire Terrier: World’s Smallest Therapy Dog

Best Puppy Yorkshire Terrier: World’s Smallest Therapy Dog

Best Puppy Yorkshire Terrier: World’s smallest therapy dog has been acknowledged in New Jersey. The amazing thing about this little pooch is that she’s a working dog! Lucy is a 2.5lb working dog visiting needy people, sick and elderly, this little puppy is now in the Guinness World Records as the tiniest assistance dog in the world.

Affectionately known as a Yorkie, this breed was first brought into the USA around the 1870s. The first account goes back to that era where new Americans were following the trends from England, and, as their name implies, these little pooches originally came from Yorkshire in the United Kingdom.

Best Puppy Yorkshire Terrier: World’s Smallest Therapy Dog

A Yorkshire Terrier weighing just 2.5lbs is officially the smallest working dog in the world.

A Yorkshire Terrier from New Jersey in the US has been named the world’s smallest working dog.

Three-year-old Lucy is 5.7 inches high and weighs just 2.5lbs, which is less than 12 sausages. However, despite her tiny size, she still works hard and is a therapy dog with volunteer group Leashes of Love.

She travels around hospitals, special schools and nursing homes in her local area visiting elderly and disabled residents, which earned her the Guinness World Record for being the smallest working dog on the planet.

Lucy’s owner Sally Leone Montufar, 56, stated: “I said I bet she’s not the tiniest, but I’m sure she’s the tiniest therapy dog.”

She also described the moment she found her pet, explaining a woman came into the boutique where she works to see if anyone wanted a dog before they were taken to a shelter.

Lucy was hiding away in a handbag and Ms Montufar claimed it was love at first sight.

“She was so pitiful and lethargic I couldn’t leave her,” she added.

Even if they are not as tiny as Lucy, small dogs still need special care and attention, especially when it comes to their diet.

High-quality food is essential for breeds like Yorkshire Terriers. Because their stomachs are smaller, they eat less and therefore need the right nutrients to stay fit and healthy. Click here to visit the original source of this post

Best Puppy Yorkshire Terrier: World’s smallest therapy dog, and a pint sized pooch needs the right feeding regimen to keep her healthy and to keep those little bones strong. A smaller kibble nutrient rich dog food will provide the goodies the miniature dogs needs for good health and well-being. Extra care needs to be taken with such a small dog, and keeping an eye out to be sure not to step on its little feet, or get too close to aggressive dogs who may not be trustworthy around your Yorkie.

Share

Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Written by Senior Editor Peter Gehr

Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Best puppy housebreaking tips: How to housetrain an adult dog. As the saying goes, “You can’t teach old dog new tricks,” but I beg to differ as I’ve done it myself, and seen it done successfully by others too. Yes, it will be a challenge, and will take patience on your part, but if you’ve adopted a dog from the pound or rescue center then you need to be aware that the dog will have habits that will need to be changed, and this is where your love and patience will need to kick in.

It may take 3 or 4 weeks for you to break any bad habits, and if one of those is housebreaking, then this time-frame will be about right—as long as you are consistent and caring, and give the dog a chance to learn and be educated.

The particular case below is from an expert dog trainer and friend of the Cesar Millan, Cheri Lucas. The article below is in response to a question posed by a dog-lover who rescued a Yorkshire terrier from a dog mill:

Best Puppy Housebreaking Tips: How to Housetrain an Adult Dog

Dogs that have been kept in puppy mill environments often never see the light of day. The everyday sights and sounds that you and I are used to can be overwhelming to a dog that has spent the first several years confined.

Often breeding dogs are kept in cages with wire flooring to minimize clean up. Dogs are naturally hardwired not to want to be near their own waste, but dogs kept in these conditions are forced to urinate and defecate in the small space they live in. Lying in their own filth becomes the norm.

Even if he doesn’t show it, your Yorkie may be feeling very stressed out at the idea of being in the great outdoors. Remember, he spent the first five years of his life in an environment that was stark and small. If he’s too tense, he will wait until he’s more relaxed inside your home before he urinates and defecates.

Inside of putting him outside alone, take him on a nice long walk first. If he doesn’t eliminate at this time, go to your backyard with him. Keep your interactions with your dog to a minimum during this time. It will be easier for him to relax and decompress if he’s not focused on you. If he eliminates at this time, calmly reward him with praise. Now you can bring him inside, knowing that he actually took care of his business outside.

It’s very important that you supervise your Yorkie when you bring him back into the house. If you can’t watch him 100 percent of the time, set up a comfortable, small confinement area or a crate for him. I’m a big believer in crate training, and your Yorkie is a perfect candidate for it. Not only is a crate the perfect house training tool, it’s also a modern day den for your dog—a safe and secure comfort zone.

You’ll need to take your Yorkie outside more frequently than normal until he establishes new habits. It may take several weeks for him to understand this unfamiliar routine. Chances are he will make a few mistakes along the way. Using strict supervision will allow you to correct him when you witness “pre-potty” behavior such as sniffing, circling, or scratching the floor. When you see this, quickly but calmly lead him outside and wait for him to eliminate. Reward the behavior before bringing him back inside. Click here to visit the original source of this post

Best puppy housebreaking tips: How to housetrain an adult dog will depend on your regularity, and this will make all the difference to the outcome. Be aware that an older dog will make mistakes, and it’s important that you do not get angry or lose your patience during this adjustment period. Especially if a dog has come from an abusive situation, and a dog mill can definitely slot into that category. Keeping in mind that accidents will happen will make this transition more comfortable and attainable for your new canine, and sticking to a systematic program will lead to a successful change of habits.

Please Like, comment and share with your Facebook friends.

Share